Vitamin K – All you need to know

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Vitamin K is a fat-soluble vitamin that plays a critical role in blood clotting and bone health. It is also necessary for the proper functioning of certain proteins in the body. There are two main forms of vitamin K: vitamin K1 (phylloquinone) and vitamin K2 (menaquinones).

Vitamin K1 is found in leafy green vegetables such as kale, spinach, and broccoli, while vitamin K2 is found in fermented foods such as cheese, yogurt, and natto (a traditional Japanese food made from fermented soybeans). Vitamin K can also be obtained from dietary supplements. The recommended daily intake of vitamin K varies depending on age and sex, but generally ranges from 90 to 120 micrograms (mcg) per day for adults.

Vitamin K has many potential health benefits, including:

  1. Blood clotting: Vitamin K is necessary for the proper functioning of blood-clotting proteins and helps to prevent excessive bleeding.
  2. Bone health: Vitamin K is necessary for the proper formation of bone matrix and may help to reduce the risk of osteoporosis.
  3. Cardiovascular health: Vitamin K may help to reduce the risk of heart disease by improving the elasticity of blood vessels.
  4. Cancer prevention: Some studies have suggested that vitamin K may help to reduce the risk of certain types of cancer, such as liver and prostate cancer.

It’s important to note that more research is needed to fully understand the potential benefits of Vitamin K and how it may impact health. It’s always best to consult with a doctor or dietitian to determine the right amount for you. Also, high doses of Vitamin K can be harmful, so it’s best to stick to the recommended daily intake.

Source of Vitamin K

Vitamin K can be found in a variety of foods, including:

  1. Leafy green vegetables: Kale, spinach, broccoli, and lettuce are all good sources of vitamin K1.
  2. Fermented foods: Cheese, yogurt, and natto (a traditional Japanese food made from fermented soybeans) are good sources of vitamin K2.
  3. Meat and fish: Some types of meat and fish, such as liver and salmon, contain vitamin K.
  4. Fruits and vegetables: Some fruits and vegetables, such as blueberries, kiwi, and Brussels sprouts, also contain vitamin K.
  5. Oils: Some oils, such as canola and soybean oil, are rich in vitamin K.

It’s worth noting that vitamin K is a fat-soluble vitamin, which means that it is best absorbed by the body when it is consumed with a source of fat. So, it’s best to consume vitamin K-rich foods with a source of healthy fats, such as nuts, seeds, or vegetable oils, to enhance the absorption of this vitamin.

It’s always best to consult with a doctor or dietitian to determine the right amount for you, and to have a well-balanced diet to ensure you’re getting the right amount of Vitamin K.

Benefit of Vitamin K

Vitamin K has many potential health benefits, including:

  1. Blood clotting: Vitamin K is necessary for the proper functioning of blood-clotting proteins and helps to prevent excessive bleeding.
  2. Bone health: Vitamin K is necessary for the proper formation of bone matrix and may help to reduce the risk of osteoporosis by improving the bone mineral density.
  3. Cardiovascular health: Vitamin K may help to reduce the risk of heart disease by improving the elasticity of blood vessels and also by reducing the calcification of blood vessels.
  4. Cancer prevention: Some studies have suggested that vitamin K may help to reduce the risk of certain types of cancer, such as liver and prostate cancer.
  5. Insulin sensitivity: Vitamin K may improve insulin sensitivity and glucose metabolism in type 2 diabetes.
  6. Facial wrinkles: Vitamin K may help to reduce the appearance of facial wrinkles.
  7. Brain health: Vitamin K may help to reduce the risk of cognitive decline and improve cognitive function.

It’s important to note that more research is needed to fully understand the potential benefits of Vitamin K and how it may impact health. As always, it’s best to consult with a doctor or dietitian to determine the right amount for you. Also, high doses of Vitamin K can be harmful, so it’s best to stick to the recommended daily intake.

Recommended Vitamin K intake daily

The recommended daily intake (RDI) of Vitamin K varies depending on age, sex, and other factors. The following are the general recommended daily intake of Vitamin K for different groups of people:

  1. Infants 0-6 months: 2 micrograms (mcg) per day
  2. Infants 7-12 months: 2.5 mcg per day
  3. Children 1-3 years: 30 mcg per day
  4. Children 4-8 years: 55 mcg per day
  5. Children 9-13 years: 60 mcg per day
  6. Adolescents 14-18 years: 75 mcg per day for males and 90 mcg per day for females
  7. Adults 19+ years: 120 mcg per day for males and 90 mcg per day for females
  8. Pregnant women: 90 mcg per day
  9. Breastfeeding women: 90 mcg per day

It’s important to note that these are general guidelines and it’s best to consult with a healthcare professional to determine the right amount of Vitamin K for you. Some people may require more or less Vitamin K depending on their individual needs and health conditions. Also, it’s worth noting that, the recommended intake for Vitamin K is given in micrograms (mcg) which is the standard measurement used in most countries.

Vitamin K Injection

Vitamin K injections are a way to increase the body’s Vitamin K levels when oral supplements or a balanced diet is not sufficient. These injections are typically administered by a healthcare professional, such as a doctor or nurse, and are given intramuscularly (into the muscle) or intravenously (into a vein).

Vitamin K injections are typically prescribed for individuals who are unable to absorb enough Vitamin K from oral supplements or a balanced diet due to certain medical conditions, such as cystic fibrosis, or for people who have a deficiency caused by genetic disorder. They may also be prescribed for people who are at risk of Vitamin K deficiency due to certain lifestyle factors, such as a strict vegan diet, or heavy alcohol consumption.

It’s important to note that Vitamin K injections should only be administered under the supervision of a healthcare professional, as an excessive intake of Vitamin K can lead to toxicity and serious health problems. Also, it’s always best to consult with a doctor or dietitian to determine the right form and the right amount of Vitamin K for you.

It’s worth noting that, while Vitamin K injections are available, they are not the first choice of treatment. In most cases, a balanced diet and oral supplements are the preferred method of increasing the levels of Vitamin K in the body. However, in some cases such as newborns, Vitamin K injection is given shortly after birth to prevent a bleeding disorder called Vitamin K deficiency bleeding.